Tag Archives: salad

SUPAFOOD – Soft Opening!

1Remember when I got a sneak peek into organic Chinese oasis, Sohofama? Well, the team behind Sohofama is back with something new – but this time it’s fast food. Organic fast food – a.k.a. SUPAFOOD2Yesterday I dragged along Molly, a foodie friend who’s been on a BBITES adventure with me before, to check out the first day of their soft-opening. Although the décor inside is still taking shape, the food was in full form – and we had lots of fun eating our way through their lunch menu.4Basically, there are salad box options – including pork, chicken and more – as well as rice box options, where you can substitute the rice with quinoa if you’re feeling extra healthy. Molly and I said “stuff that,” quite literally, and went for the rice instead.

The service was friendly and fast, leaving us ample time over Molly’s one-hour lunch break from the office to dig into the pretty huge serving sizes. Everything tasted fresh and refined. YUM!3Although we knew that we’d get pretty full from the two boxes (yes, we split them 50-50), we couldn’t resist trying one of the desserts on option: organic POWER BALLS (love that name!)supafood1They’re made out of coconut powder, flaxseed, oats and peanut butter. Texture: rich and sable-like; flavour: explosive! Haha!!

Hope you’ve enjoyed my preview of Supafood! BBITE you later 🙂

Bakker x

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Français Facts !

Page_4Bonjour et bienvenue! 

In honour of Bastille day (the 14th of July), today’s post is all about fun French food facts!

French terms are thrown around the dining scene all the time, but nobody ever explains what they mean – or where they come from!

Having lived in France before, I’ll take you through some popular French foods: how to pronounce the words properly, as well as some fun facts that could surprise you!

So, on y va (let’s go!)1

1. amuse-bouche
Pronunciation: amooz-boosh
Français fact: Ever been to a fancy French restaurant, and they bring out cute little snacks before your meal? They’re complimentary (or so I’d like to think) and are meant to tease your appetite. The words amuse-bouche literally mean amuse-mouth: a way to entice the palette before the main show!

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2. baguette
Pronunciation: bag-eht
Français fact: Baguettes are pillars of French family life. This loaf of bread has a characteristic long, thin shape and is eaten at almost every meal. The word baguette can also refer to an orchestra conductor’s baton – but more importantly to Hong Kongers – chop sticks are called baguettes (plural) in French.

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3. café au lait
Pronunciation: cafay-olay
Français fact: Coffee with milk is called a latté in Italian, and a café au lait in French. Lait means milk, by the way 😉

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4. compote
Pronunciation: kohm-poht (silent ‘e’)
Français fact: If you see a dish on the menu “served with fig compote”, for example, what does that mean? It’s kind of like jam – but not really! Compote is made by slow-cooking fruit with sugar syrup. Spices are often added while the mixture slowly reduces to a sticky, sweet concoction. It’s a popular companion to foie gras and the origin of the word is from compost (like at the farm)… yummy(?!)

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5. crème brûlée
Pronunciation: crem-broolay
Français fact: The best crème brûlées are served thin. What do I mean? The bowl it’s served in shouldn’t be deeper than a few centimetres. A bigger surface area, and a shallower depth = a better balance of crispy burnt sugar, and delicious vanilla-flavoured custard. As for the words? They mean burnt cream.

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6. croissant
Pronunciation: kruh-sawn
Français fact: Ever noticed this famous French pastry looks like a crescent moon? It’s not by accident: the word croissant has multiple meanings, the most obvious being “crescent” – and trust me when I say, a good one is hard to find! The best have a buttery richness; aren’t chewy; are wonderfully flaky on the outside; and moist on the inside.

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7. escargot
Pronunciation: s-car-go
Français fact: Yes, the French eat snails – but only specific varieties are fit for consumption. The most popular way it’s served, is with pesto and garlic. They are a bit rubbery and take a while to break down while chewing, so if you’re faint of heart, beware!

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8. foie gras
Pronunciation: fwua grah
Français fact: It sounds fancy, but it means fatty liver. Not as nice in English, I know. While the way foie gras is made has been an animal rights issue for decades (duck and geese are force-fed to make it), it remains a staple on fine dining menus all over the world. My illustration above shows two of the most common ways it’s eaten: cold as a pâté (similar to a block of butter), or hot (fried) in its original form.

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9. mille-feuille
Pronunciation: meal-fuy
Français fact: A “thousand layers” is that crispy, flaky dessert where many, many layers of thin puff pastry sheets alternate between layers of cream. It’s often topped with sugar icing and is totally irresistible.

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10. petits fours
Pronunciation: puh-tee-foor
Français fact: Petits fours are very similar to amuses-bouches, except that they come at the end of the meal. Petit four means little oven. Is that cute, or what?

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11. salade niçoise
Pronunciation: salahd knee swaz
Français fact: Nice (pronounce “niece”) is a wonderful coastal town in south-eastern France, and its culinary style is typically Mediterranean. Salade niçoise has a lot of goodies: tuna, egg, green beans, olives, anchovies, onion, potatoes and tomatoes. A native of Nice is referred to as a niçois (male) or niçoise (female), in the same way someone from the US is called an American. It’s sad that most outside of France don’t know where this salad calls home, so next time you dig in: remember Nice and thank those French foodies for this classic tuna salad.

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12. le sniff

Last, but not least, what’s up with that weird custom that goes on in French restaurants? You know, when the waiter pours a little bit of wine into a glass (but only one person on your table – usually the one paying, lol) and waits for you to smell it. The purpose is to make sure you’re satisfied with the quality before serving the whole table. It’s only really acceptable to reject the wine if it’s “corked” (bouchonné), which means the cork has contaminated the wine. This is something you can smell and taste immediately, hence the tradition. How do you know if it’s corked? It smells like cork, and will mess up the wine’s aroma, and flavour.

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Thank you for reading, if you’d like to see more educational posts like this one, please let me know in the comments 🙂 – and one more thing to say before signing out: VIVE LA FRANCE!

Bakker x

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Feeling Tai Hang(ry)? An Afternoon at Stone’s

1It was with the promise of “Hong Kong’s best burger” that I joined my friend Earl to check out one of his favourite Tai Hang haunts… Earl was the photographer for Bakker’s Bites 2nd Birthday photo shoot, so it was a foodie reunion, too!  🙂2About ten minutes walk from Tin Hau station on Lin Fa Street West, Stone’s, an American diner, was our destination. And, of course, the day we chose to go, it was pouring with rain. 3While I  can’t comment on whether or not Stone’s restaurant truly has the best burgers in HK, what I can tell you is this: the food, atmosphere and owner are all certified awesome.

First of all, Stone’s boasts some remarkable artwork. These include…

– John Wayne (signed silk screen) by Andy Warhol
– Chinese Portrait (oil on canvas) by Feng Zhengjie
– Jim Morrison with Treble Meanings No. 6 (acrylic on canvas) by Chan Yu
– 1335 (original print) by Xanti Schawinsky

…and more!4The menu at Stone’s is dominated by a hearty burger selection – and although there are other American classics on the menu, burgers are what both Earl and I opted for.5My choice was Burger #3U.S. Prime Beef Patty / Crispy Onion Rings / Crispy Bacon / Pepper Jack Cheese / Lettuce / BBQ Sauce / Pickle.

I gladly devoured this burger, which was cooked exactly as I had requested: rare. In true American style, the portion was huge and generous. Mixing up the sweet BBQ and onion rings with salty bacon and cheese was oh-so-indulgent, in all the best ways.

Happily, I was allowed to get a “bit of both” when it came to a side of either French Fries or salad. The fries were great: crispy but not too oily, which came as a relief because I already had to eat bacon, beef, deep-fried onions and cheese!6Earl went ligher with Burger #4 Grilled Chicken Breast / Grilled Pineapple / Jack Cheese / Apple Cider Dressing / Mixed Greens

Let me tell you something: that apple cider sauce is incredible! Just try not dipping every bite of your plate (from burger, to french fry and salad) into it… I dare you, I double-dare you!

Cooked perfectly tender and matching the pineapple’s sweetness, this option is good for a lighter burger – which I realise is a total oxymoron 😛7Little did we know, we were in for even more of a treat when Joel showed us his very special signed Campbells soup can and vintage 1982 edition of Playboy magazine. I was delighted to see such a relic from the golden days of journalism – before the internet changed everything!8And if you thought Playboy was a “dirty” magazine, think again! Yup, that’s right: an interview with opera legend Luciano Pavarotti was beautifully preserved inside the copy.9After sitting for at the bar for ages, eating and discussing writing, art and famous celebrities from yesteryear, owner and super nice dude Joel Bess insisted we try their version of chocolat fondant. Just as he promised, it had a whole lot of ooze…

A perfectly sweet way to end the meal, it came piping hot and was garnished with some cute fruit, including blueberries, strawberries and a ground cherry.10Before lunch was over, another regular of Stone’s showed up with an even older copy of Playboy; this time from 1973!!! This resulted in about half an hour more of looking through it in amazement – what a treat looking through all those vintage ads, and fantastic pre-PhotoShop photography.

Named after Joel’s mentor, Mr. Harlan Stone (who encouraged Joel to open his dream restaurant), the kind of clientele that this hidden gem attracts is great, and something tells me that weird and wonderful things happen there all the time… 

If it was dinner, I would have certainly indulged in one of the many exotic beers available at Stone’s11But, I guess that’s a whole other story… 😉

Bakker x